Jean sibelius sibelius - leonard bernstein - symphonies nos. 5 and 6


Listen out for: The hymn-like theme towards the end of the piece. This was later given words and is one of the most important national songs in Finland, second only to the real national anthem.

The Finnish composer Jean Sibelius may have asked that question once too often. The crisis point of his career arrived in the late nineteen-twenties and the early thirties, when he was being lionized as a new Beethoven in England and America, and dismissed as a purveyor of kitsch in the tastemaking European music centers, where atonality and other modern languages dominated the scene. The contrasts in the reception of his music, with its extremes of splendor and strangeness, matched the manic-depressive extremes of his personality—an alcoholic oscillation between grandiosity and self-loathing. Sometimes he believed that he was in direct communication with the Almighty (“For an instant God opens his door and His orchestra plays the Fifth Symphony,” he wrote in a letter) and sometimes he felt worthless. In 1927, when he was sixty-one, he wrote in his diary, “Isolation and loneliness are driving me to despair. . In order to survive, I have to have alcohol. . Am abused, alone, and all my real friends are dead. My prestige here at present is rock-bottom. Impossible to work. If only there were a way out.”


Jean Sibelius Sibelius - Leonard Bernstein - Symphonies Nos. 5 and 6Jean Sibelius Sibelius - Leonard Bernstein - Symphonies Nos. 5 and 6Jean Sibelius Sibelius - Leonard Bernstein - Symphonies Nos. 5 and 6Jean Sibelius Sibelius - Leonard Bernstein - Symphonies Nos. 5 and 6

gmaej.govti.us